Growing Interest in Telehealth?  Problem who pays for it?

This week I came across several articles on Telehealth, two with different points of view. The links are below:

Comstock’s: The Doctor Is (Logged) In

The rise of telehealth targets rural patients and preventative medicine.

https://www.comstocksmag.com/longreads/doctor-logged-0#comment-2655

POTs and PANs: The Slow Growth of Telemedicine

One of the most hoped-for benefits of rural broadband has been the use of telemedicine to conduct routine doctor visits via a broadband connection rather than requiring rural patients to drive to cities for a doctor’s visit. However, the use of telemedicine hasn’t grown as fast as once predicted.

https://potsandpansbyccg.com/2018/12/04/the-slow-growth-of-telemedicine/

In the early 2000s Intel developed some interesting telehealth devices and after exploring the market sold off the development unit, as they could not identify how and who was going to pay for in-home health monitoring. They approached the government and were rebuffed, same response from the medical insurance companies. Unable to find a source of revenue for its telehealth products Intel abandoned the in-home health monitoring market.

More insight at the Rural Health Webinar below:

https://ruraleconomytechnology.com/2018/12/06/upcoming-rural-health-webinar-december-13/

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Upcoming Rural Health Webinar – December 13

The Global Cities Team Challenge Smart Agriculture and Rural SuperCluster, which is facilitated by NTIA and NIST, is hosting a webinar on the Rural Health Initiative on December 13 at 1pm ET.  The webinar will discuss the launch of the Rural Health Intuitive (RHI) to improve access to high-quality healthcare in rural America. CoBank, WTA Foundation, and Perry Health are the founding sponsors of the Initiative, which seeks to help healthcare providers, including hospitals, clinics and behavioral/mental health agencies to bring high quality care into patient homes.  Tailored for rural settings, Perry’s software offers providers the ability to deliver digital care plans, remotely monitor health metrics, and provide interventions via telemedicine through an app-based platform.  The RHI intends to work with various stakeholders to address a community’s specific health issue challenges, such as diabetes, opioid abuse, heart failure, and lung-related diseases.  The scheduled webinar speakers include Sarah Tyree, Vice President, Policy and Public Affairs, CoBank; and Anshu Vaish, CEO, Perry Health.  NTIA’s Jean Rice will moderate.  For more information, contact jrice@ntia.doc.govWebEx Webinar Site No pass code needed.  Meeting code is 740128910.  Call in: 866-860-0870; passcode: 74729120

Digital Cities: Building the New Public Infrastructure

Broadband section of white paper by CISCO.

Laying the Foundation: Public Wi-Fi and Next-Gen Broadband

At just 3 percent or, $59 billion, of Digital Value at Stake, public Wi-Fi and broadband offer modest direct value for cities. But that low percentage belies far more significant indirect benefits, which is why public Wi-Fi and broadband underpin our discussion of digital capabilities.

Direct benefits of municipal networks come mainly through avoiding the high costs of leased lines and carrier-provided network services. In some cases, such as the City of Santa Monica’s, the city itself acts as an Internet service provider to residents and local businesses, drawing in additional revenue.

Barcelona’s more than 300 miles of fiber optic cable, for example, enable its many smart services, including water, energy, waste, and transportation management, as well as open government. This network is critical to smart lighting, public Wi-Fi, and the city’s nearly 20,000 smart utility meters.

Santa Monica’s mayor, Tony Vazquez, stresses that the city’s extensive investment in fast broadband “returned significant benefits for our community health, safety, education, and wellbeing as well as for stimulating and sustaining our local economy.” He cites CityNet as the catalyst for a vibrant startup community that has been dubbed “Silicon Beach.”

Virginia Beach, Virginia, is laying hundreds of miles of fiber optic cable to link almost 100 municipal buildings with high-speed broadband. City officials anticipate that the network will promote economic and educational opportunities, while speeding emergency response times and enabling traffic management. It is also supports their strategy of bridging the “digital divide” to fight inequality.

As of 2017, Seoul is offering free Wi-Fi in every public place, including subway cars and buses. The city sees public Wi-Fi as a cornerstone of its Open Data Plaza, an online channel where information is shared on everything from economic opportunities to available parking spaces.

Guayaquil is expanding its fiber-optic network and will soon provide free Wi-Fi to the entire city. One of the many benefits has been a telemedicine capability that allows patients in local clinics to receive expert diagnoses from major hospitals.

Full paper can be downloaded HERE.

Rural communities need to fully examine the benefits of a public network as an economic development tool. Build it and the entrepreneurs will come.

This Technology Is About to Change the World–But No One Is Talking About It

Marc Emmer at Inc. Magazine

5G will drive artificial intelligence, Internet of Things, and change the world forever.

You’ve heard it all before. Augmented reality, virtual reality, AI, robots, blah, blah, blah.

5G is the ugly duckling of technology, yet it is the one that will radically change the world. According to the MIT Technology Review, 5G is a “technological paradigm shift, akin to the shift from the typewriter to the computer.”

Here are seven ways small and mid-market businesses will benefit.

1. 3D
One technology that has not broken through is holographic projection, the technology offered in head-mounted displays. While technologies such as Google Glass were a flop, they were introduced prematurely. The business implications for 3D are enormous.

In the near future, business meetings will be held in 3D, allowing for more meaningful modeling, use of CAD drawings, and more “lifelike” presentations. Imagine the use of holographs for purposes of proving an illustration of how a product could work, or in sales training. 3D will be a new world.

2. Enhanced Video
Companies will have access to higher resolution video with low latency. While this has implications for everything from video games to marketing, perhaps the most immediate impact will be in recruiting. Companies use video for recruiting, but in a clumsy fashion and usually only as a supplement for face-to-face interviews. Enhanced video will allow companies to expand the reach of whom they recruit and promote a faster process.

3. Opportunities for Telecommunication Companies
World War III has broken out in telecommunications, where Qualcomm has developed a modem that will deliver 5G. But the company is saddled by ongoing anti-trust issues with the EU, Apple and others. To date, the major cell phone carriers have not announced plans for 5G-enabled phones to be released in the near future.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the telecommunications industry employs over 760,000 workers, many of whom will take part in the rollout of 5G and related technologies. The greatest opportunities emerge when there is chaos in a market, and this market defines chaos.

4. Healthcare
Today’s implanted wireless devices are unreliable. MIT News says the use of Internet of Things (IoT) in healthcare-enabled devices will dramatically expand, allowing patients and care providers real-time data and more predictive care.

5. Smarter Homes and Cities
5G will be the spark to ignite IoT as home and business devices like security, lighting and audio will become more capable and cheaper to operate. Companies in this space will thrive.

Companies in 5G-enabled cities will have an advantage over those who do not. AT&T is rolling out 5G in phases, beginning with this year’s watered-down version expanding into 140 markets.

6. Connectivity for Customers
According to The International Journal of ICT Economy, Governance and Society, 5G will provide connectivity to 90 percent of the world’s population by 2027. Companies offering payment systems, healthcare and business services to the third world will have access to new markets and customers.

7. Autonomous Vehicles
Hype about autonomous vehicles has been muted by recent accidents that highlight their unreliability. For roadways to support millions of autonomous vehicles will require more reliable networks. 5G will allow autonomous vehicles to better detect hazards, communicate with other vehicles, interact with smart signage and follow more precise maps.

If you live in a rural community, this is all pie in the sky that you will never see unless you go to the big city an visit a family relative who can give you a demonstration. 5G is highly dependent on a robust and expensive infrastructure to bring the broadband signals to the antenna and return them to the server farms for some AI inferencing and data storage.

Rural communities do not have broadband access today because they lack the backbone infrastructure to bring the network into the community, and the reason is cost. The 5G infrastructure is more complex and more costly than the missing 4G infrastructure. So who is going to pay for the 5G infrastructure? The same people that did not bring you the 4G infrastructure because it cost too much. 5G companies are ROI driven; they are not in the charity business.

If you are a rural community decision maker do not believe the 5G hype, it will never happen in your community if the telcos have to build the costly infrastructure. Build a community network and sell the bandwidth to the 5G providers.

What no one is talking about is the infrastructure cost of 5G!

Telemedicine Webinar Feb 27th 11:30 PST

Topics Covered:

• How to fill gaps in your healthcare services, with highly specialized clinical telemedicine.
• How to partner with academic medical centers to leverage their services and extend your ability to treat more patients.
• The most effective clinical workflows to ensure patients’ satisfaction, sustainability/continued success.
• Telemedicine business models that make the most sense for rural healthcare providers.

Sign up HERE: