OneWeb: Investor Write Down

Japanese technology giant Softbank has written down the value of its stake in British satellite maker OneWeb by £380m, the Telegraph can reveal.

OneWeb, which is backed by Softbank, Airbus and Sir Richard Branson’s Virgin Group, has burned through billions in investor cash for its plans to launch a web of hundreds of low-orbit satellites.

Softbank took an impairment loss on its stake in OneWeb earlier this year, while some early investors have lost as much as half of the value of their stakes, a source said.

Founded in 2012, OneWeb is one of Britain’s technology “unicorns”, a start-up valued at more than $1bn.

It hopes to launch hundreds of satellites to improve mobile and internet connections…

 

This not good news for OneWeb who seem to be having problems getting spacecraft launched.

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What is Software Defined Radio?

A question many people may ask when discussing 5G network technology.

With the exponential growth in the ways and means by which people need to communicate data communications, voice communications, video communications, broadcast messaging, command and control communications, emergency response communications, etc. – modifying radio devices easily and cost-effectively has become business critical. Software-defined radio

(SDR) technology brings the flexibility, cost efficiency and power to drive communications forward, with wide-reaching benefits realized by service providers and product developers through to end users.

[. . .]

Simply put Software Defined Radio is defined as
:
“Radio in which some or all of the physical layer functions are software defined”

A radio is any kind of device that wirelessly transmits or receives signals in the radio frequency

(RF) part of the electromagnetic spectrum to facilitate the transfer of information. In today’s world, radios exist in a multitude of items such as cell phones, computers, car door openers, vehicles, and televisions.

Traditional hardware-based radio devices limit cross-functionality and can only be modified through physical intervention. This results in higher production costs and minimal flexibility in supporting multiple waveform standards. By contrast, software-defined radio technology provides an efficient and comparatively inexpensive solution to this problem, allowing multimode, multi-band and/or multi-functional wireless devices that can be enhanced using software upgrades.

More HERE.

Most 5G cell site radios are SDR devices. These software devices provide the operator the ability to define multiple networks for performing different tasks, low latency network for real-time control, a plethora of connections for IoT devices, and wide bandwidth for big data applications. Virtual software-defined networks will also manage the data flow between devices. Antenna beams will also be formed by software. Think of a 5G mini-cell as specialized computers in a plastic pizza box connected to power and a network data source.

Here is one without the Pizza Box Cover and Antenna array:

Screen Shot 2019-07-15 at 8.42.53 PM

 

Rural  Households Left Out of Internet Growth

Reading reports of internet growth over the past year, I learned that U.S. households consumed an average of 268.7 gigabytes (GB) of data in 2018. This is up from 201.6 GB for 2017, according to OpenVault, a leading provider of industry analytics and technology solutions for ISPs.

Some other findings by OpenVault:

In 2018 the percentage of households exceeding 1 terabyte of usage was 4.82%,

The rate of households using 1terabyte all more almost doubled in 2018, rising to 4.12% of all households up from 2.11% in 2017.

In 2018 the percentage of households exceeding 250 GB rose to 36.4% up from 28.4% in 2017.

Impressive growth across the board, indicating that consumption is growing across service providers’ entire subscriber bases, not just among the heavy users,  good news for everyone with one exception. Rural households that do not have access to high-speed internet did not experience any of this growth.

According to reports by the California Public Utilities Commission, less than half of roughly 680,900 households in rural California have broadband access. And, many of those that are connected have services which do not meet the minimum standards of 6 Mbps down and 1 Mbps up, or the FCC standard of 25 Mbps down and 3 Mbps up.

It is highly unlikely that rural households will get any high-speed internet access in the near term. The brightest light on the horizon is service by the LEO satellites that will be coming online in 2020, maybe late in 2019 at the earliest.  

On Becoming Broadband Ready — A Toolkit for Communities

The Next Century Cities Toolkit offers a step-by-step guide on how to assess and establish your community’s broadband options.

Introduction

In 2018, the time has long passed since broadband access was optional. The internet has grown out of its luxury status and is now a bedrock ingredient for resilient communities. Fast, affordable, reliable broadband is essential to the long-term success of a community and to the health and happiness of its residents.

Cities, towns, and counties have an extraordinary amount of resources that can be leveraged to encourage investment in broadband infrastructure and ultimately lead to greater connectivity. While there is no one connectivity model that works for every community, there are common threads that run through the diverse array of successful projects. This toolkit is a compilation of those practices and the first-stop resource for any community seeking strategies and solutions to connect its residents.

Download your copy HERE.

 

Video of SpaceX Simulations

This is a video of Starlink simulation by Mark Handley, a professor at University College London. This is a video of the Phase 1 revision. It shows now a Starlink network is created with inter-satellite links and then used to simulate communicate between major cities across the globe.

This Starlink network is 2X faster then fiber networks over long distances. This will be the bread and butter feature of the network that will ensure it’s a financial success. Rural communities can take advantage of this success by becoming Starlink users.

For the reader who wants more details on Starlink, read this Draft Paper —Delay is Not an Option: Low Latency Routing in Space

 

5G Stealing the Show at Consumer Electronics Show.

The 2019 Consumer Electronics Show (CES) officially kicked off in Las Vegas on Tuesday, and devices with 5G connectivity are stealing the show.

The annual conference, which is taking place January 8-11, showcases the latest mobile and connected technology from more than 4,500 exhibiting companies. CES is an important event for developers and manufacturers because it provides a peek at technological shifts.

Consumers Are Interested in Subscriptions for Connected Devices
Business Insider Intelligence
Devices with 5G connectivity were the chief focus at the conference this year, with Qualcomm and Intel making announcements that are poised to transform various industries.

Qualcomm’s chipsets will spearhead the first wave of 5G smartphones. Qualcomm expects its new Snapdragon 855 mobile platform and X50 5G cellular modem to power more than 30 5G devices, mostly smartphones, in 2019. The addition of 5G connectivity will provide considerable improvements to handsets, from more secure fingerprint scanning to faster AI-driven tasks, encouraging more users to upgrade.

Car manufacturers demoed Qualcomm’s 9150 C-V2X chipset, which set the future for connected cars with 5G. Automakers including Audi, Ford, and Ducati staged how the chipset, which will run on 4G and 5G networks, can be leveraged to enable vehicle-to-vehicle communications. Ford, for instance, plans to use the tech in all US models starting in 2022. Qualcomm’s chipset presents cellular carriers with an opportunity to add connected car subscriptions, which consumers are highly interested in paying for despite their lack of widespread availability. For instance, just 30% of consumers own a connected car, but nearly half (49%) are interested in paying a monthly subscription for a connected car, according to Business Insider Intelligence’s Telecom Competitive Edge report (enterprise only).

Intel will facilitate the shift to 5G-powered laptops. Intel lifted the lid on a new initiative, dubbed Project Athena, that aims to open the door to a new class of advanced laptops with 5G connectivity and AI capabilities. The company is developing a roadmap for PC makers including Microsoft, Google, Lenovo, Dell, and Samsung to bring Project Athena devices to market in the second half of this year. Integrated 5G connectivity will provide wireless carriers with an additional opportunity to diversify revenue streams and expand wireless subscriber bases.

Source: Business Insider

In 1996 I gave a presentation at a conference in Canada on Intelligent Vehicle Highway Systems. In my slide presentation, I showed how vehicles would be integrated into the digital grid, the internet. When I predicted that in the near the future cars would have an IP address, there was a lot of snickering and laughter in the audience. Only later it occurred to me I had been laughed off the stage. Today 30% of consumers own a connected vehicle and soon with G5 built in it will become a standard feature. Too bad many citizens living in rural communities will not be able to take advantage of this connectivity until they drive to an urban location with 5G.

Collins Coming For FCC Subsidies

— Rep. Doug Collins , the top Republican on the House Judiciary Committee, is gearing up to introduce legislation aimed at tightening requirements for the FCC’s broadband subsidies under the Connect America Fund, according to letters circulated by his office and obtained by POLITICO. Some subsidy recipients “have taken taxpayer dollars but failed to fulfill their obligations to their customers,” the Georgia lawmaker wrote in a letter seeking co-sponsors for the measure.

— “The CAF Accountability Act ensures that CAF recipients are reporting the speeds they are actually providing consumers – not those that are the product of gamed performance testing software, unrepresentative sampling, or repeat testing locations,” Collins continued. He alleged that ISPs in his rural district offer “consistently bad” speeds below what’s required of their subsidies.

One of the advantages of having a recording box that samples the speed every 30 minutes and then can be plotted on a graphic, provides clear evidence what speed the ISP is providing.  This is my DIY recorder.  Good up to about 250 Mbits.

Raspberry Pi BB Recorder

Here is a sample output:

Wave Tri Display

D-Link Offering a 5G Hotspot

d_link_5g_nr_router__dwr_2010_.0

Consumer Electronics Show 2019 hasn’t officially started yet, but it’s clear that 5G is going to be a big theme at this years show. Case in point: D-Link’s new 5G NR Enhanced Gateway(also known as the DWR-2010), a home router that instead of plugging into a traditional cable jack or modem, instead will use 5G mobile broadband to supply Wi-Fi for a house.

D-Link isn’t offering a whole lot of information just yet as to how much the device will cost, which carriers it’ll be working with, and what data prices will look like compared to traditional broadband, but it’s certainly an intriguing concept considering the promises of 5G, particularly if it really can deliver comparable speeds without requiring the same level of building-by-building infrastructure.

That said, D-Link is offering a few promising details: according to the company, the DWR-2010 will offer speeds up to 40 times faster than the average broadband speed in the US of 70 Mbps (which some quick math works out to 2.8 Gbps). Additionally, the DWR-2010 is expected to support both the sub-6 GHz and mmWave portions of the 5G standard, whenever it does release to carriers to sell sometime in the second half of 2019.

Source The Verge

Valley Vision Broadband News

AT&T Home 5G Coverage to Hit 12 Markets Before 2019

Rural Americans are Rebooting the Spirit of the Internet

FCC OK’s SpaceX to Launch 7,518 Additional Broadband Satellites 

Rural Kids Face an Internet Homework Gap

Business, Education, and Healthcare Top of Mind as Rural Broadband Expansion Inches Forward

Neighborly Launches its Broadband Accelerator into 35 Cities, Stoking Momentum for Open Access Fiber