FCC Funds Satellite Broadband in Nevada County

The Union has the details:

The FCC is giving Viasat more than $400,000 to bring high-speed satellite internet to Nevada County customers.

The funding is part of the Federal Communications Commission‘s Connect America Fund, whose second phase granted $14 million to California internet service providers to connect rural areas with high-speed internet. Viasat was the only satellite-based internet service provider to win funding and will receive $429,669 to service just over 1,000 customers in the county over 10 years.

According to Nevada County’s broadband strategy, low population density and rugged topography make providing broadband internet a challenge, compelling the county to rely on a patchwork approach that pulls from many different resources and brings together varied solutions throughout the county.

“All together, these challenges create a patchwork of coverage and non-coverage areas across our county,” according to the county broadband website. “It is common to find a home that has wireless or wired service, yet the next door neighbor cannot be served due to one of these challenges.”

Continue reading HERE.

Money Quote: “In the county’s broadband plan, satellite internet is an afterthought, finding the Connect America Fund as unreliable . . .”

The County Plan does not recognize there are three kinds of satellite internet provided by space-based ISPs: geosynchronous orbit, with high latency, mid orbit with lower latency and low earth orbit with low latency. The future is low latency high-speed internet from space.

A Viasat project that is going to take 3-10 years is too little too late. SpaceX will start offering “fiber-optic like services” from low latency satellites starting in mid-2020, with full service by 2012, in just two years customers will have access to higher-speed services than Viasat can provide from geosynchronous orbit over three to ten years. Amazon plans to have full ISP service from space in five years, OneWeb three years.

LEO broadband will be worth waiting for, 15ms latency, 1Gig + speeds up and down.

More details HERE and HERE

Nextgov: Laser-Linked Satellites Could Deliver ‘Internet from Space’

 

sat_model

Such a network could potentially reach remote and underserved areas.

A new design could double the network capacity of future “internet from space” systems.

Satellites do not yet play a major role in the world’s internet infrastructure. However, this may soon be set to change.

Within the next decade, a new generation of satellites could lay the foundations for an “internet from space,” says Ankit Singla, professor at ETH Zurich’s Network Design & Architecture Lab. His team is investigating how to improve the performance of large-scale computer networks, including the internet.

Exploiting advances in cost-cutting technologies in the space sector, the new satellite systems would use thousands of satellites instead of the tens of satellites used in past systems. Laser light could then link these satellites to each other to form a network.

The coverage these satellites would provide could reach remote regions that currently have no or very limited access to the internet. These regions are either entirely unconnected or poorly connected to the intercontinental fiber-optic cables that power today’s internet.

The ‘Internet from Space’ Race

The capabilities of the LEO satellites have triggered a new, contested “space race,” with heavyweights such as Elon Musk’s SpaceX and Jeff Bezos’ Amazon throwing their hats into the ring. These companies are developing large-scale satellite constellations with thousands to tens of thousands of satellites. These would orbit the Earth at speeds of 27,000 km/h (16,777 mp/h) at a height of around 500 km (around 311 miles) (traditional geostationary satellites orbit at around 35,768 km (22,225 miles).

SpaceX, for example, has already launched its first 120 satellites and is planning to offer a satellite-based broadband internet service from 2020. In addition to global coverage, the technology used in the “internet from space” promises high data transfer rates without major delays in data transmission. The latency, as computer scientists call these delays, is significantly lower than that of geostationary satellites, and even that of underground fiber-optic lines for long-distance communication.

“If these plans succeed, it would be a huge leap forward in the world’s internet infrastructure,” says Debopam Bhattacherjee, a doctoral candidate working with Singla to investigate the optimal design of networks for satellite-based broadband internet in order to guarantee a high-bandwidth, delay-free data flow.

Continue reading this long article HERE.

 

China’s First LEO 5G Satellite to Launch This Month

China LEOChina’s first LEO 5G broadband satellite. Photo is courtesy of China News Service.

China’s first LEO 5G broadband satellite with high capacity to meet international competition will be launched by Chinese commercial aerospace company, Galaxy Space, at the end of December, according to a statement sent to the Global Times.

The satellite is the first in China to be built with a capacity of 10 gigabits per second (Gbps) and it will be, according to the company, the world’s first LEO broadband satellite in the Q-/V-band, an extremely high frequency band.

The satellite has already been developed and ground tests have been carried out with stable results. Once in place, the satellite will be able to cover an area of 300,000 square kilometers, roughly 50 times the size of Shanghai. It is expected to narrow the technological gap between Chinese and U.S. companies OneWweb and SpaceX, who have already deployed LEO communications satellites.

Continue reading HERE

 

SpaceX Is Lobbying Against Amazon’s Internet-Beaming Satellites

Amazon is trying to get a waiver to FCC rules that companies like SpaceX and OneWeb had to follow.

Motherboard has the details:

When Amazon confirmed it was planning to launch 3,236 broadband internet-beaming satellites into low-Earth orbit, much of the media reported it as if it were a done deal—the latest, inevitable step in the corporation’s quest to conquer commerce, the cloud, and beyond.

Amazon officials said the massive satellite constellation, called Project Kuiper, would one day provide low-latency, high-speed broadband to tens of millions of underserved people around the world, no doubt also connecting them to the wide world of Amazon offerings.

But before Project Kuiper can launch, it must receive approval from the Federal Communications Commission to operate within a certain frequency spectrum. In an application filed this July, Amazon requested a special waiver to FCC rules that would grant it the necessary permission. The problem, though, is that the FCC already handed out licenses to that spectrum years ago to nine other satellite internet companies in a different, more complicated process.

Those companies—including SpaceX and OneWeb—are now lobbying the FCC to deny Amazon’s waiver request, according to FCC records. If successful, they could significantly reduce Project Kuiper’s viability in an already oversaturated market.

Top SpaceX officials have met with FCC Chairman Ajit Pai and other agency staff at least three times to lodge in-person complaints about Project Kuiper’s application, according to FCC records. The first meeting came several weeks after Amazon filed its application, the most recent took place on Dec. 2 and 3.

“Amazon’s overt attempt to override long-standing rules would undermine confidence in Commission processes, harm competition, and eliminate broadband options for consumers,” SpaceX lawyers wrote in a Nov. 25 filing. Project Kuiper would have a “significant detrimental impact [on] SpaceX … Amazon’s flawed analysis yields results that defy common sense.”

Industry experts said Amazon’s request is unorthodox, but there’s a clear reason why the company has tried a backdoor route to gain access to the coveted spectrum.

Continue reading HERE

“I’d sort of written Amazon off as not being viable simply because they hadn’t gotten started and these other guys—SpaceX, OneWeb—are already putting satellites up,” Roger Rusch, a satellite and telecommunications consultant with TelAstra told Motherboard. “By the time Amazon gets started, they’re already probably going to be years behind them.

CNBC: Why SpaceX And Amazon Are Launching 42,000+ Satellites

Since the start of the space age, more than 8,800 objects have been launched into orbit, according to estimates from the United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs. But in a few years, that number could increase significantly. Private companies plan to launch thousands of satellites to beam the internet to customers on Earth. SpaceX alone has announced plans to launch 42,000 satellites. If this happens, SpaceX will be responsible for about a fivefold increase in the number of spacecraft launched by all of humanity.

LEO Launch Schedules

SpaceX is launching 12,000 satellites, which can provide low latency “fiber-like broadband” to rural users around the globe. Initial Starlink service is projected to start in the Northern US by mid-summer, with full US coverage by the end of 2020. SpaceX has launched 120 Starlink satellites, with 60 more planned in December. SpaceX is planning two launches per month in 2020, adding capacity and customers with each new launch. By January 2021, the Starlink constellation will have 1610 satellites in orbit, providing high-speed broadband services to customers.

OneWeb, SpaceX’s nearest competitor, has launched six satellites, with more planned in 2020, starting in February, then again in October and November. Each launch will insert 32 more satellites in orbit. OneWeb is not expected to begin service until they have 350 satellites on orbit.

Screen Shot 2019-12-04 at 2.03.00 PM
Red dates indicate satellites launched, blue scheduled launches.

Russian Soyuz-ST to Launch OneWeb Communications Satellites in 2020 [Update 12-8-19]

Three launches of the Russian Soyuz-ST carrier rocket, including with the UK OneWeb communications satellites, from the Guiana Space Centre in Kourou are planned for next year, a space industry source told Sputnik.

“In 2020, three launches of the Soyuz-ST are planned from the Guiana Space Centre,” the source said on Tuesday, adding that the launches are planned for the months of February, October and November.

Update: First launch of UK’s OneWeb satellites from Baikonur now set for 30 January.

In November 2020, over 30 OneWeb communications satellites should be launched into orbit, the space industry source told Sputnik.

Last month, OneWeb announced that the launching of its satellites on Russia’s Soyuz rocket were being postponed until next year.

In June 2015, Russian space agency Roscosmos signed contracts with OneWeb and the French Arianespace company for 21 commercial launches – from the European Space Agency’s Kourou spaceport in French Guiana, the Baikonur spaceport in Kazakhstan, and the Vostochny spaceport in the Russian Far East.

Source: Space Daily

Comment:  According to some sources each Soyuz launch should carry 32 satellites into orbit, other sources 30.   In November 2020 OneWeb could have a constellation of over 90 satellites, perhaps as many as 102 (6+32+32+32).  The February launch should give us a clue as to the number of birds per launch vehicle.  By November SpaceX should have 0ver 1,500 Starlinks in orbit, given the aggressive two launches per month schedule for 2020.

 

Where were the Real Innovators?

Satellite Innovation Symposium has become the most important West Coast event for satellite professionals who follow the evolving technologies and market opportunities related to satellites and space.

Here is what the conference attendees were saying about the LEO companies, according to Wendy Lewis writing in SatMagazine:

How the proposed constellations of Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites will impact the industry remains a key question.

There were multiple discussions about the potential for OneWeb, Project Kuiper, Starlink, Telesat LEO, LeoSat and others to succeed and speculation on which might merge with others and which might be left on the drawing board.

Continue reading HERE.

I would like to have overheard some of those conversations and discussions.  If the LEO operates as planned they are going to be taking customers from these MEO and GEO satellite communications innovators. LEOs have a latency advantage they can exploit, with no way for the MEO and GEO systems to match.

The LEO broadband companies are the leading edge innovators, yet they did not exhibit or present at the Symposium “the most important West Coast event for satellite professionals.” Why?  SpaceX is going to launch more satellites than all MEO and GEO sats ever launched. Is SpaceX too busy Innovating to go to conferences where they spend hours talking about innovation?

The Sponsors & Exhibitors are HERE.  Any insight from readers? 

OneWeb 2019 Launch Delayed to 2020

Space Daily has the details

First launch of UK OneWeb communications satellites from Baikonur postponed

The first launch of UK communications satellites OneWeb from Russia’s Baikonur Cosmodrome was initially supposed to take place on 19 December.

The launch of UK OneWeb space internet system satellites from the Baikonur space centre was postponed from December this year to January 2020, three sources in Russia’s rocket and space industry revealed.

“The launch is being postponed due to the fact that the spacecraft are not ready. Their delivery to Baikonur is delayed from November to December 2019. The planned launch is postponed from 19 December to 23 January,” one of the sources said, with two other sources confirming this information.

OneWeb plans to create a constellation of satellites that will provide broadband Internet access to users around the world fully covering the Earth’s surface. In cooperation with Roscosmos, the UK communications company sent up its first satellites in February and has planned its next two launches for the end of this year and the first half of 2020.

The Link is HERE

By 23 January SpaceX is planning to have 230 Starlinks in orbit, halfway to an initial operating flock of satellites. OneWeb seems to be stumbling at the gate.

Fast Company: OneWeb Wants to Blanket the Planet in High-Speed Satellite Broadband

[. . .]

In a July test, OneWeb reported download speeds of 400-Mbps to a Seoul location as it automatically switched from satellite to satellite—with latency under 40 milliseconds, versus 600 milliseconds and up for GEO satellite.

That would make this service competitive with many forms of wired and wireless broadband, even if that responsiveness figure can’t match the sub-10-ms latency figures touted for the fastest but shortest-range version of 5G wireless.

OneWeb sees that as less a bug than business opportunity, pitching its constellation-to-be as a worldwide solution for 5G backhaul, connecting 5G networks in less-dense markets with those elsewhere.

Fast Company has more details HERE