Ariane 6 Maiden Flight Will Deploy Satellites for OneWeb

Spacedaily.com has the details:

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Ariane 6 File Graphic

OneWeb is the developer of a new global, high-speed, low latency satellite-based network designed to address the most demanding global connectivity challenges worldwide. Ariane 6 will be available to OneWeb from the second half of 2020 to provide launch capacity that supports the full deployment and replenishment of the OneWeb constellation.

The launch service agreement specifies the use of the qualification launch of the Ariane 62 version, scheduled for the second half of 2020; the two Ariane 6 options (either in its 62 version, accommodating up to 36 OneWeb satellites, or in the 64 version, up to 78 OneWeb satellites) will be utilized starting in 2023.

The OneWeb satellites will be launched by the first Ariane 62 into a near-polar orbit at an altitude of 500 kilometers before raising themselves to their operational orbit.

OneWeb’s mission is to deliver global communications through a next-generation satellite constellation that will bring seamless connectivity to everyone, everywhere.

To this end, OneWeb is building a network of low-Earth orbit satellites that will provide high-speed, low latency services to a range of markets – including aeronautics, maritime, backhaul services, community Wi-Fi, emergency response services and more. Central to its mission, OneWeb also will be focused on connecting schools and working to bridge the digital divide for people everywhere.

With its system deployed, the OneWeb constellation will enable user terminals capable of offering 3G, LTE, 5G and Wi-Fi coverage, giving high-speed access around the world – by air, sea and land.

OneWeb Terminal

Continue reading HERE. [Emphasis added]

 

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Unlocking the Digital Potential of Rural America

Unlocking the digital potential for rural small businesses across the country could add $47 billion to the U.S. GDP per year. This new study by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and Amazon estimates the economic impact of digital technologies on rural small businesses based on official statistics and a survey to more than 5,000 rural small businesses across the country.

There are 37 million working-age adults and 18 million households in the rural U.S. While accounting for close to 15% of the adult population and nearly 75% of the country’s land mass, annual revenues of rural businesses represent only 3.7% of total gross revenues in the U.S. economy.

Despite some improvement in the adoption of digital tools by rural businesses over the past decade, this new research shows how increased use of digital technology in rural America could help drive faster growth in the rural economy.

Key findings:

  • Increased adoption of online tools and digital services for businesses across rural America could create more than 360,000 jobs in the next three years.
  • Increased adoption could grow annual revenues of rural small businesses by more than 21% over the next three years – the equivalent of $84.5 billion per year – with states in the South seeing the greatest benefit
  • Online tools and technology have the highest potential impact on rural small businesses with revenue under $100,000

Read the full report HERE, including additional insights and interactive graphics.  Select California for a breakdown by state. 

Hat Tip to barberadvisors.com blog for the link to the Chamber Report.

Rural California Should Not Fret Over 5G and Start Looking for LEO Satellites

By Russ Steele

Ever wonder what the LTE in 4G LTE stood for? I always thought that LTE was the abbreviation for 4G light. In one sense it is as 4G LTE does not meet the minimum ITE standard for 4G, so it was designated 4G Long Term Evolution (LTE). Almost 4G but not quite. It does not matter what LTE stands for in those communities that do not have any 4G LTE networks by any of the four telco providers.

As you can see on the map below, there are large swaths of California census blocks which do not have a single provider of 4G LTE. FCC has designated these rural blue areas eligible for subsidies, under the Mobility Fund Phase II Program.

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Mobility Fund Phase II (MF-II) will make up to $4.53 billion in support available over 10 years to primarily rural areas that lack unsubsidized 4G Long Term Evolution (LTE) service. MF-II is critically important to supporting mobile voice and broadband coverage, incentivizing the deployment of mobile wireless service through a reverse auction, and ensuring that 4G LTE service is preserved and advanced in those areas of the country that lack unsubsidized service.

Under this schedule, it could be another 10 years before some communities final get 4G LTE service, if at all. While the Federal Government is subsidizing the build-out, one of the four telcos has to decide to bid for the subsidy and then take the risk they can build a sustainable system, without additional subsidies.

The 5G rollout is expected to follow a similar path as 4G in the evolution from 3G. The 4G rollout started in the dense urban cities and then moved to the transportation corridors and then to the suburbs and final into some rural areas with populations density was high enough to support the telco ROI calculations. AT&T started offering 4G LTE in 2011, Verizon in 2010, Sprint in 2012 and T-Mobile in 2013. Eight years later many communities still do not have reliable 4G LTE coverage.

After eight years there are still rural communities with 3G service or no broadband service at all. It is highly likely that these rural communities will ever see 5G.

Digital Trends:

The ITU IMT-2020 specification requires 5G to feature peak speeds of 20Gbps, but as we saw from 4G LTE, we can realistically expect those sorts of speeds 10 years from now. Even then, those speeds are only expected when using short-range mmWave spectrum, not longer range sub-6GHz spectrum. That means as per usual, rural areas won’t feel the benefit for a while, if at all. For now, consumers living in urban areas should expect speeds in line with LTE Advanced (or, one might say, true 4G) that will incrementally improve each year.

For rural communities that do not have 4G LTE, it will be hard to benefit from an upgrade to full 4G which will take place over the next ten years. What are rural communities to do in the interim? Let’s look at some other timelines, the LEO satellite timelines.

Just last week (02-27-2019) OneWeb launched the first six of a 600 Satellite constellation, and under the FCC agreement must have all satellites launched in six years.

SpaceX will start launching phase one satellites in late 2019 with a full constellation of 4,425 by 2024. The SpaceX LEO constellations are expected to provide G5 level speeds at fiber network latency of 25-35ms.

Telesat, which operates a large fleet of geo sync statutes announced a smaller 117 satellite LEO constellation and plans to deliver the first service in 2021.

Given these timelines, if they hold up, rural communities could have access to space-based broadband long before some will see 4G LTE or 5G. It is time they stop fretting over when will they get terrestrial 5G and start thinking about how they can benefit from space-based broadband access.  Go LEO Satellites

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Under Fire, Trump Campaign Downplays 5G Remarks

— “President Donald Trump’s campaign on Sunday sought to downplay its support for government intervention in 5G wireless networks after getting blowback from Trump administration officials who favor an industry-led approach,” Margaret reports. The proposal, first reported by John and Margaret , would see the government design a system in which federal airwaves would be shared with a single company that would use them to build a nationwide 5G network that wireless carriers would pay to access. The apparent reversal on the plan, which has been embraced by Trump’s 2020 campaign manager Brad Parscale and adviser Newt Gingrich, comes amid pushback from tech industry representatives and FCC officials.

— Here it goes again: The Consumer Technology Association’s Michael Petricone said there’s “no need” for more “government control” to win the global race for 5G deployment. Democratic FCC Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel said the plan, which she characterized as “nationalizing” 5G networks, “really misses the mark.” And Republican FCC Commissioner Brendan Carr said changing course on the U.S.’s “successful, free market approach through China-like nationalization is a non-starter.” (The White House faced similar pushback in 2018 after a leaked memo revealed the administration was considering a plan to nationalize 5G networks to compete with China.)

Source: POLITICO Morning Tech

National 5G Network?  Your thoughts?

OneWeb Network First Launch [Update]

The first of six satellites designed by OneWeb as part of a 600-satellite constellation to provide worldwide internet on Wednesday from the European Space Port in Kourou, French Guiana, aboard an Arianespace Soyuz rocket.

Source: POLITICO Space

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The OneWeb satellite constellation is a proposed satellite internet constellation of  900 satellites expected to provide global Internet broadband service to individual consumers as early as 2019.

The 900 communication satellites will operate in circular low Earth orbit, at approximately 750 miles (1,200 km) altitude, transmitting and receiving in the Ku band of the radio frequency spectrum. Most of the capacity of the initial 648 satellites have been sold, and OneWeb is considering nearly quadrupling the size of the satellite constellation by adding 1,972 additional satellites that it has priority rights to.

Source: Wikimedia[updated]

Learn more at OneWeb  

(Update 04-27-19) A Soyuz rocket provided by the European launch company Arianespace lofted six OneWeb satellites into low Earth orbit today after lifting off from the Guiana Space Center in French Guiana at 4:37 p.m. EST (2137 GMT). Those six satellites are the first of hundreds that the Virginia-based communications company OneWeb plans to launch over the next two years.

Source: Space.com