5G Stealing the Show at Consumer Electronics Show.

The 2019 Consumer Electronics Show (CES) officially kicked off in Las Vegas on Tuesday, and devices with 5G connectivity are stealing the show.

The annual conference, which is taking place January 8-11, showcases the latest mobile and connected technology from more than 4,500 exhibiting companies. CES is an important event for developers and manufacturers because it provides a peek at technological shifts.

Consumers Are Interested in Subscriptions for Connected Devices
Business Insider Intelligence
Devices with 5G connectivity were the chief focus at the conference this year, with Qualcomm and Intel making announcements that are poised to transform various industries.

Qualcomm’s chipsets will spearhead the first wave of 5G smartphones. Qualcomm expects its new Snapdragon 855 mobile platform and X50 5G cellular modem to power more than 30 5G devices, mostly smartphones, in 2019. The addition of 5G connectivity will provide considerable improvements to handsets, from more secure fingerprint scanning to faster AI-driven tasks, encouraging more users to upgrade.

Car manufacturers demoed Qualcomm’s 9150 C-V2X chipset, which set the future for connected cars with 5G. Automakers including Audi, Ford, and Ducati staged how the chipset, which will run on 4G and 5G networks, can be leveraged to enable vehicle-to-vehicle communications. Ford, for instance, plans to use the tech in all US models starting in 2022. Qualcomm’s chipset presents cellular carriers with an opportunity to add connected car subscriptions, which consumers are highly interested in paying for despite their lack of widespread availability. For instance, just 30% of consumers own a connected car, but nearly half (49%) are interested in paying a monthly subscription for a connected car, according to Business Insider Intelligence’s Telecom Competitive Edge report (enterprise only).

Intel will facilitate the shift to 5G-powered laptops. Intel lifted the lid on a new initiative, dubbed Project Athena, that aims to open the door to a new class of advanced laptops with 5G connectivity and AI capabilities. The company is developing a roadmap for PC makers including Microsoft, Google, Lenovo, Dell, and Samsung to bring Project Athena devices to market in the second half of this year. Integrated 5G connectivity will provide wireless carriers with an additional opportunity to diversify revenue streams and expand wireless subscriber bases.

Source: Business Insider

In 1996 I gave a presentation at a conference in Canada on Intelligent Vehicle Highway Systems. In my slide presentation, I showed how vehicles would be integrated into the digital grid, the internet. When I predicted that in the near the future cars would have an IP address, there was a lot of snickering and laughter in the audience. Only later it occurred to me I had been laughed off the stage. Today 30% of consumers own a connected vehicle and soon with G5 built in it will become a standard feature. Too bad many citizens living in rural communities will not be able to take advantage of this connectivity until they drive to an urban location with 5G.

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Will This Technology Save Rural 5G?

T-Mobile, Ericsson and Intel claim to have completed the first 5G data call and video call on 600 MHz spectrum. The calls, which included uplink and downlink communications, were done on a live commercial network and provided a 5G coverage area of more than 1,000 square miles from a single tower. The companies did not say what bandwidth the data call supported.

“5G will power vibrant new use cases that span across network, client and cloud—spurring the convergence of computing and communications that will enable exciting use cases ranging from virtual and augmented reality and gaming, to smart cities, connected cars and intelligent data analytics,” Sandra Rivera, the senior vice president of Intel’s Network Platform Group, said in a press release. “This collaboration with Ericsson and T-Mobile conducted over low-band spectrum and using the Intel® 5G Mobile Trial Platform is a major milestone on the path to enabling the first wave of these types of 5G experiences.”

5G Coverage Area
According to a press release, the goal of the “new” T-Mobile – a company that includes Sprint — is to use the 600 MHz band to deliver “a broad layer of 5G” that will “balance” millimeter wave (mmWave) approaches that have trouble passing through objects and has limited range of less than a square mile. However, the companies also did a three-user triband call over 600 MHz, 28 GHz and 39 GHz band spectrum.

5G is a huge transition for the broadband industry and therefore has ignited significant marketing and technology claims and counter-claims. AT&T and Verizon initially are focusing on mmWave approaches and claim that though it will take longer to deploy, the approach supports higher bandwidth and provides the truer vision of 5G. T-Mobile – which has never said it won’t use mmWave – has placed its bet, initially at least, on the 600 MHz band, which the company notes is ready now and supports a much larger 5G coverage area in comparison with mmWave.

Full Article at Telecompetitor HERE.

 

Wicker Readies 5G Hearing

— Wicker (R-Miss.) is already eyeing a potential hearing on 5G wireless deployment and said bipartisan legislation from the previous Congress from Sens. John Thune (R-S.D.) and Brian Schatz (D-Hawaii) — the STREAMLINE Small Cell Deployment Act — could be a good starting point for the panel’s examination. “I would expect 5G and privacy to be among the first issues,” Wicker told John on Tuesday. “I would hope that [5G] would be one of our first hearings.”

Source: POLITICO Morning Tech

I would like to see this committee to address some of the 5G rural issues. mmWave 5G will require an antenna tower about every 500-700 feet. That is not practical in rural communities were some driveways are longer than 700 feet. T-Mobile is claiming that their 600Mhz 5G can cover 1,000 square miles from a single tower, but refuse to declare the data bandwidth. How fast can the data flow?

Collins Coming For FCC Subsidies

— Rep. Doug Collins , the top Republican on the House Judiciary Committee, is gearing up to introduce legislation aimed at tightening requirements for the FCC’s broadband subsidies under the Connect America Fund, according to letters circulated by his office and obtained by POLITICO. Some subsidy recipients “have taken taxpayer dollars but failed to fulfill their obligations to their customers,” the Georgia lawmaker wrote in a letter seeking co-sponsors for the measure.

— “The CAF Accountability Act ensures that CAF recipients are reporting the speeds they are actually providing consumers – not those that are the product of gamed performance testing software, unrepresentative sampling, or repeat testing locations,” Collins continued. He alleged that ISPs in his rural district offer “consistently bad” speeds below what’s required of their subsidies.

One of the advantages of having a recording box that samples the speed every 30 minutes and then can be plotted on a graphic, provides clear evidence what speed the ISP is providing.  This is my DIY recorder.  Good up to about 250 Mbits.

Raspberry Pi BB Recorder

Here is a sample output:

Wave Tri Display

D-Link Offering a 5G Hotspot

d_link_5g_nr_router__dwr_2010_.0

Consumer Electronics Show 2019 hasn’t officially started yet, but it’s clear that 5G is going to be a big theme at this years show. Case in point: D-Link’s new 5G NR Enhanced Gateway(also known as the DWR-2010), a home router that instead of plugging into a traditional cable jack or modem, instead will use 5G mobile broadband to supply Wi-Fi for a house.

D-Link isn’t offering a whole lot of information just yet as to how much the device will cost, which carriers it’ll be working with, and what data prices will look like compared to traditional broadband, but it’s certainly an intriguing concept considering the promises of 5G, particularly if it really can deliver comparable speeds without requiring the same level of building-by-building infrastructure.

That said, D-Link is offering a few promising details: according to the company, the DWR-2010 will offer speeds up to 40 times faster than the average broadband speed in the US of 70 Mbps (which some quick math works out to 2.8 Gbps). Additionally, the DWR-2010 is expected to support both the sub-6 GHz and mmWave portions of the 5G standard, whenever it does release to carriers to sell sometime in the second half of 2019.

Source The Verge

Telecom Predictions for 2019

POTs and PANs as some insight to the future of telecommunications in 2019. Doug Dawson has these rural broadband predictions. My emphasis added in red.

Rural America Will Realize that Nobody is Coming to Help. I predict that hundreds of rural communities will finally realize that nobody is bringing them broadband. I expect many more communities to begin offering money for public/private partnerships as they try desperately to not fall on the wrong side of the broadband divide.

We’ll See First Significant Launches of LEO Satellites. There will be little public notice since the early market entries will not be selling rural broadband but will be supporting corporate WANs, cellular transport and the development of outer space networks between satellites.

Big Companies Will Get Most New Spectrum. The biggest ISPs and cellular carriers will still gobble up the majority of new spectrum, meaning improved spectrum utilization for urban markets while rural America will see nearly zero benefits.

Full Article is HERE.

 

NYT: 5G Is Coming This Year. Here’s What You Need to Know.

The transition to new fifth-generation cellular networks, known as 5G, will affect how you use smartphones and many other devices. Let’s talk about the essentials.

By Don Clark Dec. 31, 2018

In 2019, a big technology shift will finally begin. It’s a once-in-a-decade upgrade to our wireless systems that will start reaching mobile phone users in a matter of months.

But this is not just about faster smartphones. The transition to new fifth-generation cellular networks — known as 5G for short — will also affect many other kinds of devices, including industrial robots, security cameras, drones and cars that send traffic data to one another. This new era will leap ahead of current wireless technology, known as 4G, by offering mobile internet speeds that will let people download entire movies within seconds and most likely bring big changes to video games, sports and shopping.

Officials in the United States and China see 5G networks as a competitive edge. The faster networks could help spread the use of artificial intelligence and other cutting-edge technologies.

The crucial questions are how consumers will benefit from 5G?  Initially, only users living in densely populated areas will have 5G access via short-range mmWave devices. AT&T and Verizon are focusing on parts and pockets of cities with a point to point services, not mobile cell phone service. They plan to use lower frequencies later that go much farther than the mmWave currently in use, but that will be 2020 or beyond. According to the NYT article, this will be mobile service. In the meantime, T-Mobile and Sprint will be offering lower frequency devices for cellular service, not point to point.

As you read the article, it does not appear that rural users will be getting a 5G services soon. At least not until the lower frequency 5G is available, but only mobile services, no point to point service.

“I wouldn’t buy a 5G phone until it supports 5G in one of the lower-frequency bands,” Mr. Thelander said. “For all operators but Sprint, this means at least late 2019, and more likely 2020.”

It looks like the first rural user investment will have to be a 5G to a WiFi hotspot.

With the line of sight requirements and short-range limitations. 5G is not a rural friendly technology.