AT&T FirstNet Report

FirstNet has kept first responders connected through hurricanes Florence and Michael, and more

More than 3,600 public safety agencies across the country have now joined FirstNet. That’s a nearly 50 percent increase in the number of agencies subscribing to the nationwide wireless communications ecosystem in less than 2 months.

That accounts for more than 250,000 connections on FirstNet. And first responders from federal, state, local and tribal public safety agencies are continuing to turn to FirstNet for the communications tools they need – especially during emergencies and large events.

Read more HERE.

 

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Forbes: Five Ways 5G Will Rock Our World

Forbes interviewed a number of 5G experts and technologists to get their insights. Here are five areas where they see 5G making its mark.

1. Cord-Cutting En Masse

2. Distributed AI

3. High-Speed Data Backbone for Autonomous Tech

4. The Doctor Is In—24/7

5. Every Experience Will Be Augmented

Read the details HERE.

If you live in a rural neighbor do not get too excited, as you are last on the list to get 5G.

AT&T FirstNet Update

In July, AT&T said that equipment operating in the FirstNet spectrum band had been installed on 2500 cell sites nationwide, though the buildout was yet to be validated by the FirstNet Authority.

Earlier this month, the organization said that it would use Axon Body 3 cameras, which can alleviate danger to first responders and the public. The cameras provide live video, gunshot detection alerts, the ability to upload evidence from the field and other features.

Also this month, FirstNet provided access to the full fleet of 72 dedicated deployable network assets. They are stationed around the country and can be deployed for live events or in emergencies.

In August, FirstNet said that more than 2,500 public safety agencies across the country have joined the network. This almost doubled the amount of agencies in the project since the preceding update, which was only a month earlier.

https://www.firstnet.com

The FCC Wants Our Public Property. We’re Saying No.

By Samir Saini, New York City Chief Information Officer and Commissioner, Department of Information Technology & Telecommunications on Medium

[. . .]

Federal control of local streets isn’t going to bring more or better wireless service to Americans.

The industry and the FCC have argued that allowing wireless companies to put up equipment anywhere they please will encourage broadband deployment to underserved areas. Looking at recent history, there is no reason to believe that they actually will.

Driven by their profit motive, big wireless companies are going to go where the money is — to the rich commercial districts and dense residential areas in urban cores, upgrading the network already in place there and charging the highest rates they can get. They will not be racing to serve traditionally underserved areas at affordable rates — be they rural or urban — where the prospect of profit doesn’t look as good. This could result in the kind of “digital redlining” AT&T stands accused of doing in cities like Cleveland and Detroit.

We see this play out in NYC, where poles are priced as low as $12 per month in underserved areas yet there are very few providers looking to install in those communities. Our colleagues in rural areas tell us they haven’t been able to attract companies even when offering poles at NO cost.

[. . . ]

This is a reality check by a professional who deals with the big telcos on a daily basis. Follow the money! This money trail does not lead to rural communities.

AT&T AirGig Power Line Broadband?

AT&T has started initial discussion with suppliers for a commercial deployment of its Project AirGig, which delivers wireless broadband over powerlines. In a Monday press release, the company also detailed its plans for additional trials and research into surface-wave systems, which could help AirGig integrate better into a 5G future.

Because AirGig sends the signal across power lines, it can reach more users in rural and suburban areas. According to our sister site CNET, the deployment of AirGig could bring 100-megabit rural broadband by 2021, opening up new remote work and telecommuting opportunities for professionals around the US.

“We’ve applied for more than 500 patents for AirGig and conducted field trials both in and outside the United States,” Andre Fuetsch, president of AT&T Labs and CTO, said in the release. “And today, we’re confident that we’re on the cusp of a technology that could potentially help to solve the digital divide in this country.”

The rest of the article is HERE.

All previous attempts to use power lines to deliver broadband have failed. Why should this one be any different? Your thoughts?

This Technology Is About to Change the World–But No One Is Talking About It

Marc Emmer at Inc. Magazine

5G will drive artificial intelligence, Internet of Things, and change the world forever.

You’ve heard it all before. Augmented reality, virtual reality, AI, robots, blah, blah, blah.

5G is the ugly duckling of technology, yet it is the one that will radically change the world. According to the MIT Technology Review, 5G is a “technological paradigm shift, akin to the shift from the typewriter to the computer.”

Here are seven ways small and mid-market businesses will benefit.

1. 3D
One technology that has not broken through is holographic projection, the technology offered in head-mounted displays. While technologies such as Google Glass were a flop, they were introduced prematurely. The business implications for 3D are enormous.

In the near future, business meetings will be held in 3D, allowing for more meaningful modeling, use of CAD drawings, and more “lifelike” presentations. Imagine the use of holographs for purposes of proving an illustration of how a product could work, or in sales training. 3D will be a new world.

2. Enhanced Video
Companies will have access to higher resolution video with low latency. While this has implications for everything from video games to marketing, perhaps the most immediate impact will be in recruiting. Companies use video for recruiting, but in a clumsy fashion and usually only as a supplement for face-to-face interviews. Enhanced video will allow companies to expand the reach of whom they recruit and promote a faster process.

3. Opportunities for Telecommunication Companies
World War III has broken out in telecommunications, where Qualcomm has developed a modem that will deliver 5G. But the company is saddled by ongoing anti-trust issues with the EU, Apple and others. To date, the major cell phone carriers have not announced plans for 5G-enabled phones to be released in the near future.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the telecommunications industry employs over 760,000 workers, many of whom will take part in the rollout of 5G and related technologies. The greatest opportunities emerge when there is chaos in a market, and this market defines chaos.

4. Healthcare
Today’s implanted wireless devices are unreliable. MIT News says the use of Internet of Things (IoT) in healthcare-enabled devices will dramatically expand, allowing patients and care providers real-time data and more predictive care.

5. Smarter Homes and Cities
5G will be the spark to ignite IoT as home and business devices like security, lighting and audio will become more capable and cheaper to operate. Companies in this space will thrive.

Companies in 5G-enabled cities will have an advantage over those who do not. AT&T is rolling out 5G in phases, beginning with this year’s watered-down version expanding into 140 markets.

6. Connectivity for Customers
According to The International Journal of ICT Economy, Governance and Society, 5G will provide connectivity to 90 percent of the world’s population by 2027. Companies offering payment systems, healthcare and business services to the third world will have access to new markets and customers.

7. Autonomous Vehicles
Hype about autonomous vehicles has been muted by recent accidents that highlight their unreliability. For roadways to support millions of autonomous vehicles will require more reliable networks. 5G will allow autonomous vehicles to better detect hazards, communicate with other vehicles, interact with smart signage and follow more precise maps.

If you live in a rural community, this is all pie in the sky that you will never see unless you go to the big city an visit a family relative who can give you a demonstration. 5G is highly dependent on a robust and expensive infrastructure to bring the broadband signals to the antenna and return them to the server farms for some AI inferencing and data storage.

Rural communities do not have broadband access today because they lack the backbone infrastructure to bring the network into the community, and the reason is cost. The 5G infrastructure is more complex and more costly than the missing 4G infrastructure. So who is going to pay for the 5G infrastructure? The same people that did not bring you the 4G infrastructure because it cost too much. 5G companies are ROI driven; they are not in the charity business.

If you are a rural community decision maker do not believe the 5G hype, it will never happen in your community if the telcos have to build the costly infrastructure. Build a community network and sell the bandwidth to the 5G providers.

What no one is talking about is the infrastructure cost of 5G!