FCC Wins Battle In Small Cell Litigation?

— The FCC notched a victory Thursday in the court fight over its order pre-empting city and state laws on fees and timelines for 5G equipment installation. The 10th Circuit Court of Appeals denied a request from several cities, including Seattle and California’s San Jose and Huntington Beach, to halt implementation of the order while the litigation is pending. The court sided with the FCC, which opposed the request, finding that the cities failed to show that there would be “irreparable harm” if the order takes effect in part as planned Jan. 14. Republican Commissioner Brendan Carr, who spearheaded the order, cheered the ruling as “more good news for U.S. leadership on 5G.”

— Win some, lose some: The 10th Circuit, based in Denver, also on Thursday granted a request from the cities to transfer the case to the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in California. The FCC, Verizon, Sprint and industry trade groups had opposed the transfer.

Source: POLITICO Morning Tech

Well, with the transfer to the 9th Circus it will not be long before we are reading about a reversal of this decision. The 9th Circus is the most liberal anti-capitalism court in the Nation. I would give the Cities a win and the 5G Providers a loss. This issue will most likely end up at the Supreme Court.

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NYT: 5G Is Coming This Year. Here’s What You Need to Know.

The transition to new fifth-generation cellular networks, known as 5G, will affect how you use smartphones and many other devices. Let’s talk about the essentials.

By Don Clark Dec. 31, 2018

In 2019, a big technology shift will finally begin. It’s a once-in-a-decade upgrade to our wireless systems that will start reaching mobile phone users in a matter of months.

But this is not just about faster smartphones. The transition to new fifth-generation cellular networks — known as 5G for short — will also affect many other kinds of devices, including industrial robots, security cameras, drones and cars that send traffic data to one another. This new era will leap ahead of current wireless technology, known as 4G, by offering mobile internet speeds that will let people download entire movies within seconds and most likely bring big changes to video games, sports and shopping.

Officials in the United States and China see 5G networks as a competitive edge. The faster networks could help spread the use of artificial intelligence and other cutting-edge technologies.

The crucial questions are how consumers will benefit from 5G?  Initially, only users living in densely populated areas will have 5G access via short-range mmWave devices. AT&T and Verizon are focusing on parts and pockets of cities with a point to point services, not mobile cell phone service. They plan to use lower frequencies later that go much farther than the mmWave currently in use, but that will be 2020 or beyond. According to the NYT article, this will be mobile service. In the meantime, T-Mobile and Sprint will be offering lower frequency devices for cellular service, not point to point.

As you read the article, it does not appear that rural users will be getting a 5G services soon. At least not until the lower frequency 5G is available, but only mobile services, no point to point service.

“I wouldn’t buy a 5G phone until it supports 5G in one of the lower-frequency bands,” Mr. Thelander said. “For all operators but Sprint, this means at least late 2019, and more likely 2020.”

It looks like the first rural user investment will have to be a 5G to a WiFi hotspot.

With the line of sight requirements and short-range limitations. 5G is not a rural friendly technology.

AT&T FirstNet Report

FirstNet has kept first responders connected through hurricanes Florence and Michael, and more

More than 3,600 public safety agencies across the country have now joined FirstNet. That’s a nearly 50 percent increase in the number of agencies subscribing to the nationwide wireless communications ecosystem in less than 2 months.

That accounts for more than 250,000 connections on FirstNet. And first responders from federal, state, local and tribal public safety agencies are continuing to turn to FirstNet for the communications tools they need – especially during emergencies and large events.

Read more HERE.

 

Forbes: Five Ways 5G Will Rock Our World

Forbes interviewed a number of 5G experts and technologists to get their insights. Here are five areas where they see 5G making its mark.

1. Cord-Cutting En Masse

2. Distributed AI

3. High-Speed Data Backbone for Autonomous Tech

4. The Doctor Is In—24/7

5. Every Experience Will Be Augmented

Read the details HERE.

If you live in a rural neighbor do not get too excited, as you are last on the list to get 5G.

AT&T FirstNet Update

In July, AT&T said that equipment operating in the FirstNet spectrum band had been installed on 2500 cell sites nationwide, though the buildout was yet to be validated by the FirstNet Authority.

Earlier this month, the organization said that it would use Axon Body 3 cameras, which can alleviate danger to first responders and the public. The cameras provide live video, gunshot detection alerts, the ability to upload evidence from the field and other features.

Also this month, FirstNet provided access to the full fleet of 72 dedicated deployable network assets. They are stationed around the country and can be deployed for live events or in emergencies.

In August, FirstNet said that more than 2,500 public safety agencies across the country have joined the network. This almost doubled the amount of agencies in the project since the preceding update, which was only a month earlier.

https://www.firstnet.com

The FCC Wants Our Public Property. We’re Saying No.

By Samir Saini, New York City Chief Information Officer and Commissioner, Department of Information Technology & Telecommunications on Medium

[. . .]

Federal control of local streets isn’t going to bring more or better wireless service to Americans.

The industry and the FCC have argued that allowing wireless companies to put up equipment anywhere they please will encourage broadband deployment to underserved areas. Looking at recent history, there is no reason to believe that they actually will.

Driven by their profit motive, big wireless companies are going to go where the money is — to the rich commercial districts and dense residential areas in urban cores, upgrading the network already in place there and charging the highest rates they can get. They will not be racing to serve traditionally underserved areas at affordable rates — be they rural or urban — where the prospect of profit doesn’t look as good. This could result in the kind of “digital redlining” AT&T stands accused of doing in cities like Cleveland and Detroit.

We see this play out in NYC, where poles are priced as low as $12 per month in underserved areas yet there are very few providers looking to install in those communities. Our colleagues in rural areas tell us they haven’t been able to attract companies even when offering poles at NO cost.

[. . . ]

This is a reality check by a professional who deals with the big telcos on a daily basis. Follow the money! This money trail does not lead to rural communities.