Mini-Makers Faire

I have been a promoter of the Maker Movement ever since Maker Magazine was launched in January 2005.  I like to build stuff and in the 1960s and early 1970s was a Heath Kit client, making electronic test equipment, shortwave radio, and a color TV set.  And, when the integrated circuit chips with embedded processor arrived in the late 1970s, I build a computer with switches and blinking lights using an RCA 1802 CMOS Chip.  An early TRS-80 user I make a teletype printer interface to print out programs and email.  In the process, I learned how to write some 1802 machine language code plus some Basic on the TRS-80 and Fortran on a DEC-11 at work.

On Saturday, October 6th, Ellen and I joined hundreds of other tinkers, makers and future makers at the Sierra College Mini-Makers Faire, sponsored by the Hacker’s Lab.

While there was a plethora is activities from beer making, sewing, and coding, it was the multiple robotic displays and activities that was capturing the most attention of the young and mature Makers alike. There were industrial robots, intelligent robots, fighting robots, and underwater rovers.   

Hacker Lab Table

This was our third Mini-Makers Faire at Sierra College. One of the notable changes on campus is the library, it now the Library and Cyber Center.  Gone are the book stacks replace by rows of computer terminals, a Writing Center and Research Assistance Desk, and expanded coffee shop, with lots of tables for social interaction.

Today I tinker with Raspberry Pi processors. I met an exciting gent from the Hackers Lab who had created a weather station with a Raspberry Pi controller. Most interesting was an old-time radio he built with a Raspberry Pi and a storage device to playback over a 1,000 old time radio shows, Lone Ranger, Roy Rogers, The Shadow, and many more.

One of my broadband Raspberry Pi projects is HERE.

Every rural county should consider launching a gathering place for makers and hosting a Mini-Makers Faire.  Nevada County has the Curious Forge and Truckee Roundhouse. Sacramento County has two Hacker’s Labs and Placer County one.  These makers places are the incubators for tomorrows economic success. Planner and community leaders can find the recipe for a maker space in Chris Anderson’s Makers, The New Industrial Revolution. 

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