Broadband Speeds are a Local Issue

From the POTs and PANs blog:

You might think that the big ISPs deliver the same broadband products everywhere. But I’ve been seeing evidence that broadband speeds are definitely a local issue. One of the products that we’ve been using to help clients assess a new market is to get a lot of people in the potential market to take speed test. We’ve mostly been using the Ookla speed test, but probably any speed test is sufficient as long as everybody in a market takes the same test.

The results of these speed tests surprised me a bit because they showed a wide variance in the products of the major ISPs. For example, I’ve seen markets where Comcast is delivering a little more download speed than they are advertising. But I also saw tests results from a Comcast market where the speeds were about 20% less than advertised. I’ve seen the same thing with AT&T where there are markets that get only half of the advertised speeds and other markets where they were mostly delivering what they are promising. I’m not sure if there is any better demonstration that speeds are a local issue than by seeing that the big ISPs don’t deliver the same speeds in every market.

There is a long list of reasons that can account for the differences in speeds. A big one is the age and quality of the network cables. Older telco copper and older coaxial cables can cause a lot of problems with quality. The size of customer nodes is always an issue. If everything else is equal, a cable company node serving 100 customers is going to have better broadband speeds than one serving 200 customers.

Read rest HERE.

I found this quote most interesting: “One of the products that we’ve been using to help clients assess a new market is to get a lot of people in the potential market to take speed test.” It is again a reminder how important broadband is to local economies. Speed and reliability are important market values.

There are also different speed results depending on the speed test tools used. More about this in a future post, when I recount my morning with a Wave Technician.

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